Calendar Clock Repair

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Calendar Clock Repair

New postby DARipley » Tue Feb 11, 2014 9:13 pm

I sent in my Southern Calendar clock for repair. The movement keeps time but does not advance the date. When I asked the repair shop if they had any luck finding the part to repair the clock. They pointed to another calendar clock and said that it has the same problem. They said the next chance they have to find the part is at the next National Association of Watch and Clock Collectors show. I'm afraid to ask what part it needs but I think another person looking couldn't hurt.
Is there a part on Calendar Clocks that frequently have problems? The reason I'm asking is because I wave a Waterbury calendar clock #30 that will not advance the date too. But I don't want to have to many clocks in the shop at the same time. I don't want to drain my clock purchasing money on repairs. It works like the instructions say on the back of the clock to set the date but the movement isn't advancing the date.

Any ideas are greatly appreciated,
David Ripley :shock:
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Re: Calendar Clock Repair

New postby brownsrplm » Tue Feb 11, 2014 11:48 pm

Sounds like the tension spring is not holding the gear tight enough, or the gear is out of alignment with the rest of the train. This is assuming the gear for advancing the date is still in the clock.
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Re: Calendar Clock Repair

New postby brownsrplm » Wed Feb 12, 2014 12:07 am

Here is a picture of a typical calender movement, although this one is Japanese. Notice the extra gears and the spring for tension on the main gear at the top middle of the movement. Look yours over and see if it is similar to this one, it should be. If something is missing you will know right away. Another thing to look for is the trip pin in the gear to the left. Is it still on the gear? If not, one could easily be put back on it to make the calender function work.

Calender clock movement.JPG
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Re: Calendar Clock Repair

New postby John Arrowood » Wed Feb 12, 2014 4:01 pm

On American calendar clocks like the Southern, there is a snail-shaped cam on the back of the movement which turns once in 24-hours. The cam raises a rod until the attachment on the rod falls into the low point of the cam and drops down, causing some stuff in the calendar movement to move and change the day pointer and day of the week wheel. Someone with a lot more knowledge of perpetual calendars can do much better at describing how this works. I will try to post a picture of the back of one of my calendars later on today.
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Re: Calendar Clock Repair

New postby John Arrowood » Wed Feb 12, 2014 4:24 pm

Here are a couple pictures of my Ithaca Farmer's model calendar clock. The back view of the movement shows a cam attached to the middle of the back of the movement. As the cam rotates a lever with a roller attached is raised by the rotation of the cam until the roller drops and the rod going down to the calendar movement drops. The two rods that are attached to the main rod then rotate two wheels which move the date pointer and day-of-the-week roller one notch. A Seth Thomas calendar operates much the same except that the rod is only one piece. The area beneath the calendar movement is for the alarm movement which was not installed on this clock.

ithaca01.jpg
ithaca02.jpg
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Re: Calendar Clock Repair

New postby brownsrplm » Wed Feb 12, 2014 4:46 pm

John,
Thanks for posting the other style as I wasn't sure which he had. There were quite a few American made calender clocks that used the style I posted. I just worked on an Ansonia tear drop that had the other style of calender. I kind of like the two dial setup better, and it's a bit harder to find good one's. Nice clock by the way!!

As for how the movement trips, it's like the mantle movements that have a half hour strike. A cam like you described and an arm that is on a pivot with a wire running down to the other movement for the calender.
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