Max's Blog

A blog is an ongoing diary or commentary. You can communicate with other members or reflect on your life, work, or anything that comes to mind. Even if nobody reads your blog, you can keep it as an open journal. Few personal blogs rise to fame but you might gain a loyal following. One-line entries or post in great detail - it's up to you - but be prepared to receive questions and comments from other members.
Forum rules
Please take one "New Topic" and make it your blog - one topic only, please. Please post within the bounds of common decency and civility, and make your blog as long as you like. No advertising.

Any response on a blog should be to the blog owner, not to any other poster.

Re: Max's Blog

New postby Neilywatch » Thu Feb 16, 2017 6:57 pm

Im curious to see your bench plans - have you had input from, say, professional watchmakers, in developing your design?
Neil Wohl
Neilywatch
Super Member
 
Posts: 937
Joined: Mon Apr 21, 2014 7:23 pm
Location: Red Bank, New Jersey
NAWCC #: 0122281

Re: Max's Blog

New postby mars-red » Fri Feb 17, 2017 2:57 pm

Neilywatch wrote:Im curious to see your bench plans - have you had input from, say, professional watchmakers, in developing your design?


I'll happily share the plans once they exist. :) So far just ideas rolling around in my head, though I have kind of a handle on general dimensions. The only input I've had so far is from design of commercially available benches, and designs of others' home-made benches online. Many (most?) of those home made bench designs were probably amateur hobbyists like me.

Here are my desires and thoughts on the matter, I'm open to any feedback so far:

The height of commercially available benches seems fine, I see no reason to change that. I believe I should shoot for a seating height that puts the benchtop about 3 inches below armpit height, does that sound correct?

I'd like to stay narrower than the "real" benches tend to be... 30" wide is what I'm shooting for. I see two challenges with a narrower bench. First, stability. The bench will be going directly underneath a window, and will be firmly attached to the wall so stability shouldn't be an issue. Second issue is space for resting elbows and forearms. Of course a narrow bench gives no space at all for this, but I have seen some designs with retractable rests that swing out (meaning, they are hinged in the horizontal orientation and pivot that way, rather than "swinging up" like table leaves). That seems ideal to me.

I have been researching the manufacture of roll-top desks, and would like to incorporate a roll-top design with this bench as well. The desk backing where the roll-top retracts into would allow for some extra storage in the form of tiny shelves and drawers, at the back of the worktop. I like the idea of keeping the bench covered and the rolltop seems to be the nicest way to do that. The only disadvantage I can think of (other than it being tricky to make) is the possibility of the sides for the rolltop interfering with my arms. However, if I set the rolltop back a bit, so that a few inches of the worktop at the front remains uncovered, then with those swing-out arm rests I mentioned above I think the rolltop sides shouldn't get in the way.

Being a narrower bench obviously means less worktop, but it also means less space for storage. I'm thinking drawers underneath the worktop, but of course it won't be wide enough to accommodate rows of drawers down the front on either side and still have room for my legs underneath. I'm thinking of making a seat for it that tucks completely into the bench when not in use, and that has drawer storage underneath it. The typical design you'd see for a sewing machine bench. Beyond that, there is a ledge about 8" deep along the wall that this bench will be up against, which would be a good place for some additional tiny cabinets with drawers, for more storage if needed.

For the depth of the bench, I am not sure at all. I would like to make it deep enough so that the aforementioned seat that tucks under it still leaves room at the back for additional drawers. I'm thinking drawers that slide out from the sides of the bench, rather than from underneath the front. Of course that means either side of the bench must be kept clear to allow access to those drawers, but that shouldn't be a problem.

Tools, solutions, and consumables, make up less than half of the stuff I'm planning on storing in the bench. The bulk of it is spare parts and project watches. I like the idea of a rack somehow incorporated into the back of the bench for hanging watches, and I think tiers of articulated racks would be a great way to accommodate many watches without taking up much space. My lathe and associated tooling will remain in the machine shop 2 rooms away. It wasn't an easy choice, but the occasional minor inconvenience is outweighed by having my bench in a cleaner, better lit, more convenient location.

This is the first time I've organized my thoughts on the bench and formalized them, I now feel a bit more motivated to flesh it out with more specifics. I'll likely use Sketchup to start doing some modeling of it. It's easy to tweak the model in Sketchup, and once it's finalized it's easy enough to turn that into some drawings to work from.
User avatar
mars-red
Super Member
 
Posts: 481
Joined: Fri Jul 18, 2008 3:23 am
Location: Barrington, NH
NAWCC #: 0174607

Re: Max's Blog

New postby cannon pinion » Fri Feb 17, 2017 4:02 pm

I want to ask a very simplistic question about lighting. When you are working, will you be facing the window?
I had a temporary set up like that and found I had to curtain the window or else everything was backlit and very difficult to see.
As a photographer, I know that north facing windows produce the most even, clear and revealing light. It is better than any artificial light source, no matter how sophisticated, and the ultimate for portraits.
Also, I have seen some old roll top benches that had small sliding shelves recessed into the front face. I think they were intended as catch shelves but you could rest your arms on these.
Andrew Yale
cannon pinion
Super Member
 
Posts: 643
Joined: Mon Dec 30, 2013 1:22 am
Location: Jersey City, NJ

Re: Max's Blog

New postby Neilywatch » Fri Feb 17, 2017 6:36 pm

Max -

I've sat a several different benches for more than 22 years - and I can tell you right now based on your criteria you're gonna be very unhappy with your concept once it gets built.

#1 you do not need to anchor the bench to the wall - when it is all set up and loaded with tools and parts, its not gonna budge. Trust me!

#2 ALL benches have a standard height, so use that and make the chair the adjustable element. You will be very uncomfortable working with just 3 inches below your armpit. But this criteria is a personal one. So I won't harp on it.

#3 I don't know if you are cramped for space but 30' wide will not cut it. My bench is 60" wide. I will post a pic of it when I finish this post. You will not have room for ANYthing!

#4 forget the rolltop. It wasn't for dust. It was to prevent thievery. You also dont want to block the light. So if you must have backshelves. do it on the corners. I wouldn't do it at all as you need the benchtop space.

#5 The biggest complaint of EVERY watchmaker is storage space - there is NEVER enough. Why do you think benches have so many? And they go all the way to the ground! Don't skimp on storage space. I guarantee you will use every bit of it. Slide out drawers do not store as much as pull out drawers.

#6 don't forget to put in a apron. You will be very thankful for it.

#7 Don't forget to make a place for your lamp.

#8 Bench depth is usually about 24". If you make your bench about 30" wide its gonna look like a box.

#9 I'll think of more suggestions to post later. BTW, Andy is correct with orientation. It is traditional to install in front of a north facing window.
Neil Wohl
Neilywatch
Super Member
 
Posts: 937
Joined: Mon Apr 21, 2014 7:23 pm
Location: Red Bank, New Jersey
NAWCC #: 0122281

Re: Max's Blog

New postby Neilywatch » Fri Feb 17, 2017 6:50 pm

mybench2.jpg


I would have preferred to post it as a bigger picture -
Neil Wohl
Neilywatch
Super Member
 
Posts: 937
Joined: Mon Apr 21, 2014 7:23 pm
Location: Red Bank, New Jersey
NAWCC #: 0122281

Re: Max's Blog

New postby Neilywatch » Fri Feb 17, 2017 6:52 pm

I have a marble slab on the bench top itself - it makes for a very stable and hard worktop. I have all my testing equipment within easy reach. The drawers go to the floor and they are PACKED! all tools. NO parts, NO watches.

If you want more pics - just ask!
Neil Wohl
Neilywatch
Super Member
 
Posts: 937
Joined: Mon Apr 21, 2014 7:23 pm
Location: Red Bank, New Jersey
NAWCC #: 0122281

Re: Max's Blog

New postby mars-red » Fri Feb 17, 2017 7:55 pm

Neil, thanks for taking the time to provide such detailed information!

I think what would help me the most at this point is a breakdown of the tools you keep in your bench that are utilizing the storage space. Some tools might be for tasks that I don't plan on performing at the bench, some tools might be tools I don't plan on needing or owning (although you know how that goes, lol!), and some tools might be ones that I have entirely overlooked and not considered at all. I know that, at this moment, my storage needs are not substantial but I certainly know how that can change without warning.

The space my bench is going into is such that, depending on the height of the bench, there could be room for a considerable back-piece (like maybe 8"-10" tall) without affecting the light. That might become clearer after I've had a chance to do some modeling that I can post up here. The North facing aspect should be no problem, as I have the choice between either North or West facing windows. And in either case the other window will be pretty close by. It seems like a nicely lit location. In any case, I can't imagine it being worse than what I had, which might as well have been a dry cave.

I'm definitely not going with a 5 foot bench, but the 30" isn't set in stone either... it's more of a space goal that I'm shooting for, fully aware that I may need or want to compromise there. The bench I was using was a 5 foot long desk that I built risers for, and that thing was the biggest waste of space. The storage was of course not suited for what I was using it for, but beyond that it taught me just how little space I do actually use for my watch work. More than half of that bench and all it's storage space was either wasted or used for stuff that was in no way watch related.

I really want some way to cover over the bench when not in use, I still don't understand why a rolltop would be unsuitable as long as it doesn't cause issues blocking out light. Perhaps that will also become clearer after modeling, but I'm picturing a very short rolltop, maybe 8" tall. I don't think it will go much (if at all) past the ledge that will be behind the bench anyway. And unlike most rolltop writing desks I've seen, the rolltop would go back far enough as to not overhang the bench top at all. I'm not looking for anything dustproof, but a rolltop with continuous backing acting as the hinges should do well at keeping out most of the dust. Nothing I do will result in never having to clean dust from the workspace, but certainly minimizing it would be desirable. Not only that, it helps cosmetically. This will be in my bedroom, and my wife would certainly appreciate this looking like a nice piece of furniture, rather than a workbench, when not in use.

What working height do you prefer, relative to your body? I've never used a bench that was anywhere close to ideal so I'm just guessing for the most part. Also, what do you mean about pull out versus slide out drawers, I'm not clear on the difference?
User avatar
mars-red
Super Member
 
Posts: 481
Joined: Fri Jul 18, 2008 3:23 am
Location: Barrington, NH
NAWCC #: 0174607

Re: Max's Blog

New postby Neilywatch » Fri Feb 17, 2017 8:13 pm

Hey Max -

Standard bench height is 38-40".

I misunderstood your line about the drawers. I've certainly never seen a bench with drawers coming out the side - that is certainly awkward. I was thinking you wanted drawers that pivot out on an axle, like those on a Schaublin cabinet.

I cover my bench with a cloth sheet when not in use. This was the norm before all benches were installed in clean rooms with positive air flow.

Don't put your bench in your bedroom! Don't mix your work with your rest - unless of course the bedroom would be the quietest room in your house - unfortunately??? :D
Neil Wohl
Neilywatch
Super Member
 
Posts: 937
Joined: Mon Apr 21, 2014 7:23 pm
Location: Red Bank, New Jersey
NAWCC #: 0122281

Re: Max's Blog

New postby richiec » Fri Feb 17, 2017 9:59 pm

Just my 2 cents, Max. I keep files, pin vises, watch keys, movement holders, watch papers, oil and oilers, shellac, pliers, broaches, gravers, stones, case openers, calipers, micrometers, hammers, balance truing tools and poising tools in the top drawers, my large center drawers have my project watches, the side drawers have rags and polishing cloths, crystals and cases, stems and sleeves, case bows, chains, etc. I keep some parts in the drawers but most are on shelves in plastic cases across the room. My lathe is in the garage with the cleaning machine. My bench is solid maple measuring 49" long, 23" wide and has a 38" working height with an adjustable chair and 2 long drawers, 2 medium sized drawers above the long ones and 8 side drawers. All of the drawers are 17 inches deep and from 2 1/2 inches deep to 3 1/2 inches
Richard Cross
richiec
Super Member
 
Posts: 1509
Joined: Tue Jul 01, 2008 12:20 am
Location: Brick, New Jersey
NAWCC #: 0168470

Re: Max's Blog

New postby mars-red » Tue Feb 21, 2017 2:34 pm

Neilywatch wrote:Hey Max -

Standard bench height is 38-40".

I misunderstood your line about the drawers. I've certainly never seen a bench with drawers coming out the side - that is certainly awkward. I was thinking you wanted drawers that pivot out on an axle, like those on a Schaublin cabinet.

I cover my bench with a cloth sheet when not in use. This was the norm before all benches were installed in clean rooms with positive air flow.

Don't put your bench in your bedroom! Don't mix your work with your rest - unless of course the bedroom would be the quietest room in your house - unfortunately??? :D


LOL! Yes, I agree about side opening drawers not being convenient - they seemed like a good way to get additional storage for things I won't access very often. For me, watch work is rest rather than work. It's an enjoyable hobby rather than an enterprise. On occasion it provides a bit of pocket money, that's all. My options are to keep the watch area where it was, basically in a dusty unlit cave, to have it in the bedroom as I am planning, or to have no permanent watch location at all but store away everything when not in use and set it up on the dining room table when conditions permit. The bedroom is by far the best option for me.
User avatar
mars-red
Super Member
 
Posts: 481
Joined: Fri Jul 18, 2008 3:23 am
Location: Barrington, NH
NAWCC #: 0174607

Re: Max's Blog

New postby mars-red » Tue Jan 16, 2018 4:26 pm

I hope everyone has had a great start to the year!

I never did make any progress at all on that bench, but it is still somewhat on the radar. With lots of practice over the past several months using Fusion 360, it makes sense to do some real design work on it. Modeling my projects has turned out to be a lot more fun than expected!

My buddy, Justin, and I are continuing our Home Shop Machinists Podcast, that seems to be really taking off and has been a lot of fun. A while back we got a mention from John Saunders (NYCCNC), a shout out in an issue of the Home Shop Machinist magazine, and even had Adam Both (better known as Abom79) as a guest on a recent episode.

Not much radically different in the shop these days, still continuing indirect progress on the Trent Pinion Mill by getting more scraping practice. I was given a copy of Richard King's DVD for Christmas, that was quite helpful, and I have finally fitted a diamond cup wheel to my bench grinder allowing me to make and use carbide scrapers. My current practice piece is a dovetail scraping gauge large enough to use for the slides on my old lathes, then I'll make a miniature one to use for scraping in the dovetails on the Trent.

Definitely looking forward to more time in the shop this year, the latter half of 2017 was real hectic with life challenges including an aggressive work schedule.

In other exciting news (well, exciting to me at least!) I'm hunting for a car... I've always loved searching for older used cars, and I think the time has come for me to part ways with the R32. I've been bitten by the AMG bug, so am looking at AMGs based on the older C Class. We're talking early 2000s, the vintage just before Mercedes became the sole controlling interest in AMG. The thrill is in the hunt, as they say. :)

Other than a couple of miscellaneous repairs, my watch goals this year are to refine my etching process to a point where I can complete the Gruen Semithin conversion dial, and then to have a stab at case making, for an orphaned Tissot pocket watch movement I took pity on and bought years ago. Perhaps I should get on the dial making sooner rather than later, in the interest of having some actual watch-related content to post up to the board for a change!
User avatar
mars-red
Super Member
 
Posts: 481
Joined: Fri Jul 18, 2008 3:23 am
Location: Barrington, NH
NAWCC #: 0174607

Re: Max's Blog

New postby Stephan » Mon Jan 22, 2018 3:26 am

It is amazing what you can get onto a small trailer by yourself.
I have done a similar thing on a number of occasions.
I usually take with me a couple of bricks to chock the wheels and a bit of stout timber long enough to prop up the draw bar end of the trailer.
Tip the thing up till the back is at ground level.
You can then use the trusty come along to drag things up into the trailer.
It works best if you can drop the front gate and connect the winch to one of the safety chains.
A removable rear tail gate makes things even easier.

I was once offered a fairly substantial bit of testing equipment from a science lab. The staff were moving from one location to the place next door and halfway through the car park the wheels sank through the tarmac and the thing got stuck. They could not move it further and before they figured out a solution it rained.
Good buy certification. Machine written off.

I was offered it and went to collect it with my trailer. By the time the bloke concerned went to find some assistants to move it I had it loaded ON MY OWN.
They couldn't believe it. :o

I got a lot of good bits from that machine. All stainless. Well worth the trouble.
Learning all the time.
Stephan Gaal

Proud Member of Global Horology and Chapter 149
User avatar
Stephan
Super Member
 
Posts: 3307
Joined: Sun Jan 20, 2008 7:10 am
Location: Melbourne, Australia
Skype Account: stephan.gaal

Re: Max's Blog

New postby mars-red » Fri Jun 01, 2018 7:14 pm

It's been quiet around GH lately. I'm hoping to be a bit active on here over the next few months, thought I'd start with another personal update here. It's been a crazy, yet strangely productive year so far. Also quite bittersweet.

First the car stuff. In January I followed up with a fellow selling a C32 AMG that I went to see and drive when we were down South visiting my family. He ended up changing his mind about selling it and took it off the market, leaving me back at square 1. There was one for sale in Massachusetts that was supposedly a Kentucky car up until 4 years ago, in a really hard to find color. I was a bit wary because the seller had installed larger crank pulley and smaller supercharger pulley to overdrive the supercharger and produce more boost... I really wanted one that hadn't been monkeyed with. Had a hard time getting in touch with the seller, and when I finally did get a response it was in the form of text messages consisting of single word non-answers to my questions. I've never seen anyone try so hard not to sell a car, haha. I gave up and continued the search. A few nice looking candidates for sale out on the West coast (really too far away), two in the midwest (one was an absolute heap, the other for sale by a dealership for about $9k over book value), and along the way there were a few C55s that caught my eye, only one of which I pursued but it was down in Florida so I kept it as a potential option but still kept looking. Later that month during my daily craigslist hunt, I saw a 2002 C32 pop up in North Carolina. Looked great in the photos (a good start, but of course a car has to be in pretty awful shape for it to notice in photos), and only had 87,000 miles on it. Over the next couple weeks I spent several hours in a few different phone conversations with the seller, and I was getting a good vibe. His asking price was right where it should have been, and he knew enough about the peculiarities and common problems with these cars that he had proactively addressed the potentially serious and expensive ones. It needed little things here and there, some cosmetic interior issues, front tires, and a front swaybar end link. He seemed to realize that although these cars are difficult to find in good condition, buyers for them are nearly as difficult to find, and he did a great job of answering all of my questions, providing documents and additional photographs. The carfax report was clean as a whistle. Car had been down South its whole life, and had a recent inspection report from the local MB dealership disclosing issues that I was perfectly OK with for the price. Had a final Skype call with the seller, to see the car in real-time and hear a cold start of the engine. So we made arrangements to do the deal. I ended up flying down to NC over the weekend of the Superbowl, I left the house at around 12:30am Saturday. Saturday mid-day I had met the seller at the airport and was driving him and the car to a business he owned nearby, to do the paperwork. A short while later, I was on the road driving straight back home - about 900 miles. The journey went without a hitch, and man I have never driven anything that devours highway miles like this car. Gas mileage was spectacular (well, spectacular compared to the EPA rating). I stopped for fuel fill-ups and a couple times for food, other than that didn't stop. I got back home at about 1:00am that Sunday, in plenty of time to get some good sleep and go to the neighbors' house to watch the game. I've done a lot of little things to the car so far, but the only things it needed for an inspection sticker were front tires and front stabilizer bar end link.

Now, the watch stuff. I've made some good progress on my projects that were backing up. Finally finished re-servicing my buddy's Lucien Piccard wristwatch, that was suffering from rusted keyless works. He's a photographer and does a lot of weddings. He was in the habit of wearing this watch all the time, even in the middle of summer while outside working & sweating. The case is what I'd call "dust proof" - it'll keep larger particles out, but certainly not sweat. I've never seen anything like it. The inside of the case and the dial plate near the keyless works were encrusted with, I guess it would be salt, from the evaporated sweat. Gross. Next up was a modern pocket watch with an inexpensive Chinese mechanical movement that had a lot of sentimental value to the owner. It had stopped running, and turns out the movement was just packed with dust, fibers, and hairs. The cases they used on these things have gaping holes around the hinges and latches (both front and rear are hinged), there's really no way to keep out foreign matter if you actually carry the thing. That was a straightforward enough job, but boy do I hate the wire springs they use in those movements. Next up was a 21 jewel Illinois pocket watch that was a bit of a mystery. It belongs to my uncle, but I've no idea how he came across it. It ticked but would stop frequently until jostled or turned the right way. This one was a real piece of work. Pretty watch but had some careless servicing in the past (stray screwdriver marks and screw heads slightly chowdered up). After disassembly, thorough cleaning, and oiling it ran beautifully... in certain positions. I had inspected all the pivots, jewels, and escapement very carefully during cleaning so I was really surprised. I discovered that something within the balance assembly was fouling some other component(s) in certain positions. It almost seemed like the balance rim was sometimes touching the top of the pallet bridge, but then it almost seemed like the roller and pallet fork were interfering with each other. Upon closer inspection of the balance assembly, which I probably should have done in the first place (I really just checked the pivots, hairpsring, and roller jewel), I found that not only was the balance wheel installed incorrectly, but so was the roller table. In the case of the balance wheel, it was seated crooked against the hub on the staff, and had not been properly riveted in place. Given the half-hearted riveting attempt, I was able to easily seat the wheel fully and then finish the riveting job. In the case of the roller table, there was such a great whopping pile of shellac used to hold the roller jewel that it was preventing the roller table from seating properly against the shoulder of the balance staff (the shellac hit against the shoulder on one side before the table itself did). I used a razor to chip away the excess shellac. The safety roller (separate from the roller table in this case) was a bit too loose on the staff too, so I closed the hole a bit. All of that did the trick, and she's running like a champ now. I looked around the inside of the case back for some service history and based on that, it has been staffed at least twice in the past. Whoever did it the last time must have left it in this partially running state... I wonder how long ago that was, I don't know if the numbers scratched into the caseback are supposed to be date codes or if they're just some sort of work order # used by the repairer. Next up on the bench, currently in progress, is an old 17 jewel Seiko Sportsmaster automatic that I was given by an older fellow who used to live in our neighborhood. It had a "piece of the dial" rattling around behind the crystal and cosmetically was really really dirty. It ran, mostly, but not well and would stop sometimes. He didn't want it anymore, hadn't worn it in decades and had no interest in it. I'm not really sure why but I instantly took a liking to it. The movement isn't out yet, but the caseback is off. And I've taken a close enough look to see that the piece rattling around behind the crystal is a case clamp (!!!! how did that even get there?), and the corresponding screw was found underneath the winding rotor as soon as I took off the caseback. Weird. Not really sure what to expect when I get in there, but the movement looks surprisingly clean at a glance. Most of those projects I plan on posting a bit about here, in the appropriate forums. Just wanted to give an overview of what I've had going on in the watch world lately.

Lastly, and most important, is family stuff. There has been a death on my wife's side of the family, one of her brother's in-laws. Our little girl (2 years old) was really really sick for about a month and a half, it just got worse and worse, and it culminated in a 1am visit to the emergency room (for the 3rd night within 2 weeks), with a full body rash so bad that she was just beet red from head to toe, and with a 105 F temperature. The doctors started throwing around things like Kawasaki's disease, and other stuff I only knew from watching episodes of House MD, I don't think I had ever been so upset or worried in my whole life. Turns out the rash was a bad reaction to some antibiotics they had given her a week prior (before deciding that it was in fact viral and not bacterial), and the other symptoms were something they couldn't identify even after consulting the team of exotic infectious disease specialists at Dartmouth. All they could tell us was that it was viral, it wasn't any of the nasty stuff that we were worried it might have been, and that there was no treatment other than to deal with the symptoms. She ended up pulling through it and is back to her mischievous, rambunctious self, but she gave us a pretty good scare. More recently, a couple weeks ago actually, my father gave us quite a scare too. He had a brain hemorrhage while he and my mother were out running errands. He got a sudden, intense headache, and despite his insistence that he just needed to get home, take some aspirin, and sleep it off, my mother took him straight to the emergency room... thereby saving his life. Most people don't survive. Not only did he survive, but prognosis for a full recovery is very good. It was not a clot, and was not an aneurysm. Just goes to show you how everything can change in the blink of an eye... and this whole year has really driven home how important it is to cherish every day (indeed, every moment) that you have with your loved ones. My dad was just released from the hospital and soon I'll be traveling down South to stay with my parents for a while.

I could go on about this year's happenings so far, but those are the major points and this has already been a really long post.
User avatar
mars-red
Super Member
 
Posts: 481
Joined: Fri Jul 18, 2008 3:23 am
Location: Barrington, NH
NAWCC #: 0174607

Re: Max's Blog

New postby Stephan » Sat Jun 02, 2018 12:24 am

You have been a busy boy.

Glad you appear to be over the worst of it.

Do you have a pic of the car.
Learning all the time.
Stephan Gaal

Proud Member of Global Horology and Chapter 149
User avatar
Stephan
Super Member
 
Posts: 3307
Joined: Sun Jan 20, 2008 7:10 am
Location: Melbourne, Australia
Skype Account: stephan.gaal

Re: Max's Blog

New postby mars-red » Sat Jun 02, 2018 3:21 am

Stephan wrote:You have been a busy boy.

Glad you appear to be over the worst of it.

Do you have a pic of the car.


Of course! :-)

IMG_20180423_090604-1100x617.jpg


IMG_20180423_090532-1100x617.jpg


IMG_20180601_231302.jpg


00U0U_6DL6pUGhekD_1200x900-1100x825.jpg


00E0E_7oxvvFvnmYd_1200x900-1100x825.jpg


IMG_20180412_143909.jpg
User avatar
mars-red
Super Member
 
Posts: 481
Joined: Fri Jul 18, 2008 3:23 am
Location: Barrington, NH
NAWCC #: 0174607

Previous

Return to Blogs

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest